NutriVersity https://nutriversity.com Nutrition • Weight Loss • Exercise Fri, 21 Sep 2018 14:54:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://nutriversity.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/cropped-NVIconGreen-32x32.png NutriVersity https://nutriversity.com 32 32 How We Survived Going Whole 30 for 30 Days https://nutriversity.com/blog/surviving-going-whole-30/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/surviving-going-whole-30/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 13:50:05 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=529 My sister suggested to my wife that we all do Whole 30 together.  My sister had done it before, but we had never done Whole 30, so having someone along that knew the ropes seemed like a good idea. We started May 29 – the day after Memorial Day (when we had walked the Bolder […]

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My sister suggested to my wife that we all do Whole 30 together.  My sister had done it before, but we had never done Whole 30, so having someone along that knew the ropes seemed like a good idea.

We started May 29 – the day after Memorial Day (when we had walked the Bolder Boulder).

What is the Whole 30 Diet?

For a good overview of what the Whole 30 Diet is, check out the article In a NutShell: What is Whole 30?.  Briefly, Whole 30 means:

Absolutely no alcohol, sugar (or sweeteners), dairy, legumes (including peanuts, peanut oil, soy, soybean oil), or grains (including corn, corn oil, and other corn products).  No juice, or juicing.  Nuts are allowed, but sparingly as accessories to meals. Additionally, you eat three (and only three!) meals a day, and you don’t sit down to a bowl of fruit for “dessert” (while fruit can be a part of the meal, the idea is to break some habits around snacking and desserts).  Oh – and no stepping on the scale during the 30 days, either.

And – if you cheat at all  – on accident or on purpose – you start over.

What it was like?

It’s truly a journey.  And the book (which my sweet wife read completely, but I only read certain parts) really helps.  It wasn’t until about day 10 that she told me how the book predicts the various “stages” you will go through, and it was uncanny how accurate they were!

For the first 5 days, I had a headache (which is unusual for me).  Pretty much all day, every day.  I did not reduce my calorie intake, and I had fasted from alcohol for longer periods recently, so  I’m fairly confident it was sugar withdrawals. I suppose it is possible that it could have been something else.  I intentionally did not take any pain reliever, I really wanted to get the full experience.

About days 4-7, I was cranky.  “I’m going to kill somebody” kind of cranky.  I was aware of it, so just tried to keep to myself as I worked through it.

About days 8-12, I found myself getting tired in the afternoon.  (The book calls this phase “all I want to do is take a nap”).  I still actually find that true sometimes, I suspect my carb intake could use some adjustment to get me in the proper zone.

Around day 14, we wondered why we were doing this, and thought we could bag out and get rid of all the feelings of crabbiness, being deprived, and tired.

Then, it happens.

And when it does, it’s wonderful.  The book calls it “Tiger’s Blood”, as in you feel like you have tiger’s blood running through your veins.

We needed less sleep.  We started getting about an hour more from each day, which was awesome.

And the sleep we got was better.  Less tossing and turning, waking up less often during the night, and feeling more rested when we got up.

Our skin became clearer.  (My wife and I both have since figured out that grains cause our skin to feel itchy!)

We had more energy.  In general.  Not “bouncing off the walls” energy, but the end result – between more energy, and needing less sleep, we felt like we were suddenly getting so much done!

I could think more clearly.  Difficult mental exercises became clearer and easier.

Feeling this way made it far easier to stay dedicated to the plan.  But, it was a true effort to make the choice.  Every single day, there were temptations and challenges.  And the book even predicts some of the thoughts that come to mind, like “surely 28 days is as good as 30 days?” (they are quite firm that it is not).

We did find it was easier to stay on track because we were firmly committed to doing the reintroduction.  And if you think about the reintroduction as part of the diet, then really you’re eating Whole 30 for 44 days.  And when you think about it that way, day 28 isn’t really as close to the end as it is if you think about the diet being only 30 days.

Results!

In addition to all those fabulous results, we also lost weight.  (The book indicates that something like 94% of people who do Whole 30 lose weight).  I lost 13 pounds, and my wife lost nearly 10.  (Most people tell us we don’t have the weight to loose, but we knew the truth, and these results support it!)

The results make sense when you think about Whole 30 and compare it with other diet plans or strategies.  It has a lot in common with The Zone / 40-30-30, it employs elements of Intermittent Fasting, and it is generally low glycemic (with some distinct exceptions, such as potatoes).  At the end of the day, eating Whole 30 is very consistent with the way God intended us to eat.

Realization

Granted, the first 2-3 weeks were clearly creating a feeling of deprivation.   To be honest though, after the initial timeframe passed we don’t feel deprived (for the most part!).

I have always had a weakness for bread, and I can truthfully say that it has not been an issue for me.  When I do choose to eat off-plan, I do sometimes opt for bread – but I don’t go overboard, and I haven’t found that I crave it.

Reintroduction

One of the reasons I describe Whole 30 as an elimination diet is because a significant point of this diet is to learn how different foods affect you.  With that in mind, we took the reintroduction phase very seriously.

Over the course of about 2 weeks, you strategically reintroduce some of the food groups that you have eliminated.

For example, one day eat legumes – peanut butter on some apple slices as part of breakfast, soy sauce with your sashimi for lunch, and a side of black beans with your dinner.  Then, for the next two days, eat Whole 30 compliant.  By doing this, we were able to determine which foods affected us, and which did not.  Surprisingly, nearly all of them did affect us in some undesirable way.

During reintroduction, you also split grains into two categories and reintroduce them separately: non-gluten containing grains, and gluten-containing grains.  In this way, you can more easily identify if you have an issues with grains, or if it’s gluten.

The book suggests breaking a particular food into it’s own reintroduction if you have any suspicions about it.  My wife decided that corn specifically may be an issue for her, so we did corn completely separate from all the other grains during reintroduction, and we are glad we did, because she was right.

Recommendation

If for no other reason than the amazing new food insights – even for people who are “food aware” – I strongly recommend trying the Whole 30 plan.  Do it for 30 days, take the reintroduction seriously, and find out your unique reactions to different foods, and become aware of the prevalence of soy and sugar.

For our parts, we have decided to integrate Whole 30 into our lifestyles.  While we aren’t committed to eating Whole 30 compliant for every meal every day, we are going to be intentional about eating Whole 30 compliant the majority of the time.  Life throws enough circumstances each week that we will likely eat 2-3 meals per week that are not compliant, but that leaves 18-19 meals per week that are, and we expect the results to be worthwhile.

If you’re thinking of trying it out, check out the article [tips for following whole 30].  They are invaluable, and will ensure you the best chance of success!

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Top 10 Tips For Following Whole 30 https://nutriversity.com/blog/top-10-tips-following-whole-30/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/top-10-tips-following-whole-30/#respond Tue, 11 Sep 2018 13:51:21 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=556 Don’t know what the Whole 30 Diet is? Check out the article In a NutShell: What is Whole 30? 1. Read the book. Before you start.  Or, at least own it.  Trying to figure things out on the fly can be frustrating, and if you read through the book ahead of time, or can consult it […]

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Don’t know what the Whole 30 Diet is? Check out the article In a NutShell: What is Whole 30?

1. Read the book.

Before you start.  Or, at least own it.  Trying to figure things out on the fly can be frustrating, and if you read through the book ahead of time, or can consult it along the way, it’s super helpful.  And while Google can help you solve the riddle of “is [some food I want] Whole 30 compliant?”, there’s enough tips, recipes, and other good info that the book is totally worth the investment.

2. Find a couple of stores that you like.

We shop at Kroger stores, but were having a hard time finding a few things.  When we finally stopped at a Trader Joe’s, it was a game changer for us.  We could get several key ingredients there that were important to succeeding with Whole 30.

3. Figure out some key substitutions (and stock up).

This one tip is a life-saver – and could be it’s own article!

With no dairy means no butter.  We were in the habit of using butter a lot, and not just as a cooking fat.  Learning that Ghee (or clarified butter) is Whole 30 compliant, and is as tasty and effective as butter, meant we didn’t have to give up the buttery flavor.  Ghee is very expensive ($8-10 for 1.5 cups) – so we are experimenting with making our own (there’s a recipe in the Whole 30 book).

We very much enjoy a latte in the morning (I make them every morning with our own espresso machine – a fabulous investment!).  However, no dairy means no milk.  And no soy means no soy milk.  Almond milk is OK, but isn’t our favorite.  My sister tipped us off to NutPods (strange name, but tasty alternative), which is almond milk and coconut cream.  It’s a bit tricky to find locally, but Amazon carries it.  My sister has it on auto-ship from Amazon to be sure she never runs out. For us, thankfully we were able to find it at our local Kroger stores, and at a good price too.  We considered making it, but aren’t sure that it makes economic sense.

Mayo is out (which I’m sure is fine with many of you!), but I enjoy mayo.  Learning to make our own was actually easy, and I prefer the taste.  We make a batch every couple of weeks, and it takes maybe 5 minutes to whip up.

Vegetable oil is out, so we used olive oil and canola oil (depending on the situation).

And we just tried out Coconut Aminos as a replacement for soy sauce.  While not the same, it certainly delivered in flavor, and was quite good.

And lastly – you might find yourself getting tired of eggs in the morning, so a nice alternative like Chia Seed Pudding (not strictly recommended by Whole 30, but not prohibited either) is pretty great.  It’s easy to make ahead and is tasty too.

4. Keep it simple.

We didn’t get too fancy: it was mostly meat (or eggs) and vegetables or fruit.  With some good seasoning, we actually really enjoyed what we were eating.  There’s no need to try and get fancy, but if you DO want to, there’s great recipes in the book.

5. Prepare food ahead.

We found it was much easier when we’d prepare breakfast or lunch the night before, and whenever make our favorite potato “hash”, we are sure to make enough for a few meals – which saves a lot of prep time.

6. Do it with a partner.

The support and accountability is invaluable.  Personally, I couldn’t have done this without my wife.  I would have cheated, then cheated again, then bailed on the whole idea.

7. Plan to do the reintroduction.

Knowing we were going to do the reintroduction phase, and do it seriously, shifted our mindsets and made it far easier to stick with the plan.

8. Do the reintroduction.

We learned a LOT about foods and their effects on us.  Things we will remember, and take into account, for the rest of our lives.  The reintroduction is easy.

9. Keep a journal during the reintroduction.

Journal your weight, what you ate, and how you felt each day.  Being able to look back and see that “hey, the day after I ate grains, my skin broke out” helps make it much clearer what foods affect you in what ways.

10. Find ways to enjoy water.

Since you basically will be drinking only water, you may want to find some ways to spruce it up a bit.  My sister sent some essential peppermint oil – one drop of that in a large glass of water makes it easier for me to drink enough water.  Sometimes we’ll fill a pitcher with water, and put some sliced cucumber and some mint in the pitcher and let it steep for a bit.  We can refill the pitcher several times without having to replace the cucumber or mint.  My wife enjoys Le Croix (and other sparkling waters).  Just make sure they don’t contain added sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Curious how it went for us, and if we lost any weight? Check out Going Whole 30 for 30 Days

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In a NutShell: What is Whole 30? https://nutriversity.com/blog/what-is-whole-30/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/what-is-whole-30/#respond Mon, 10 Sep 2018 13:23:17 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=558 What is the Whole 30 Diet? Whole 30 is best described as an elimination diet.  For 30 days, you completely eliminate several food groups that are common “problem” foods for people.  And completely is a key word: zero tolerance for 30 days.  If you blow it for even one meal, you are supposed to start […]

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What is the Whole 30 Diet?

Whole 30 is best described as an elimination diet.  For 30 days, you completely eliminate several food groups that are common “problem” foods for people.  And completely is a key word: zero tolerance for 30 days.  If you blow it for even one meal, you are supposed to start over.  (Sounds harsh, but sure helps your commitment level when you may be tempted otherwise!).  And before you start wondering why some of the food groups are eliminated, I’d recommend that you get the book – it does a fabulous job of explaining the diet, and the reasoning behind all of the exclusions and the “rules” that the diet imposes).

For thirty days, you consume zero:

Alcohol.

No wine, beer, spirits – or any alcohol at all.  This includes foods that contain alcohol (like this extreme example: vanilla extract).

Sugar.

This includes all foods that contain sugar.  This one is a real eye-opener, because you’ll quickly discover that sugar is added to nearly everything: lunch meat? Yep.  Ketchup? You probably knew that.  Oh – and this rule also includes artificial sweeteners, so no Diet Coke or other sodas, and it rules out other natural sweeteners like Stevia.  (The idea is to break that sweet craving).

Dairy.

No milk.  No cheese.  No cream in your coffee (thankfully coffee is OK!)  No sour cream.  No butter. (Clarified butter is OK, and we used it a lot).  Zero dairy.

Legumes.

This seemed like it would be easy enough, until I learned that peanuts are a legume (so no peanuts, nor peanut butter, or peanut oil), and probably the single most difficult ingredient to avoid: soy.  Soy is in everything.  Store-bought mayo is out (because of soy).  Vegetable oil is out, because it includes (or “may include”) soybean oil. We used olive oil almost exclusively, but eliminating soy made it difficult to buy many, many foods from the store.

Grains.

Grains was the one that made me nervous, because I’m a huge bread-lover.  Surprisingly, I don’t miss it.  It’s worth noting that grains include a lot more than just wheat:  grains include rice, oats (as in oatmeal), quinoa, barley – all grains. And guess what? Corn is a grain, so that removes corn, corn oil, and all the other corn products we discovered we had been enjoyed regularly.

A Few More Rules…

In addition to eliminating these food groups, eating Whole 30 also came with some rules:

Eat three – and only three – meals a day.  No snacks (except a post-workout snack).  No dessert.  The book does an excellent job of describing the reasons why, and they make sense.  Plus, they make it clear that even though a bowl of fruit would comply with the food rules, the spirit of whole 30 says you do not sit down to a bowl of fruit for dessert.  You can have some fruit with your meal, but the intention is to break the habit of having a sweet dessert.

Nuts are an accessory, and should be used sparingly.  And again – peanuts are a legume, so they are completely out.

No juice, or juicing.  While this wasn’t a problem for us (we don’t typically drink juice or juice fruits or vegetables), this may be a problem for some.

No weighing yourself during the 30 days.  This was particularly difficult for us.  We’re in the habit of weighing in every morning.  And the curiosity started getting to us as we saw our bodies respond to the diet after a few weeks.

Oh – and if you blow it – even for one meal, you are supposed to start over at day one.  Starting over at day one after being on this for a week or two was motivation enough to stick with it!

There are good, legitimate reasons for all of these, which I touch on in more detail in the “Reintroduction” section later.

Reintroduction

One of the reasons I describe Whole 30 as an elimination diet is because a significant point of this diet is to learn how different foods affect you.  With that in mind, we took the reintroduction phase very seriously.

Over the course of about 2 weeks, you strategically reintroduce some of the food groups that you have eliminated.

For example, one day eat legumes – peanut butter on some apple slices as part of breakfast, soy sauce with your sashimi for lunch, and a side of black beans with your dinner.  Then, for the next two days, eat Whole 30 compliant.  By doing this, we were able to determine which foods affected us, and which did not.  Surprisingly, nearly all of them did affect us in some undesirable way.

During reintroduction, you also split grains into two categories and reintroduce them separately: non-gluten containing grains, and gluten-containing grains.  In this way, you can more easily identify if you have an issues with grains, or if it’s gluten.

The book suggests breaking a particular food into it’s own reintroduction if you have any suspicions about it.  My wife decided that corn specifically may be an issue for her, so we did corn completely separate from all the other grains during reintroduction, and we are glad we did, because she was right.

Some of the Consequences…

Eliminating these foods ended up having several natural consequences.  That includes:

We barely ate any packaged foods.  There are so few that comply with all the restrictions, we ended up preparing virtually everything we ate.  There were a couple of Kind bars that were compliant, and honestly I think that’s the only “packaged” food we ate – and even those were infrequent.

We barely ate out.  During the entire 30 days, we ate out exactly twice: Once at a local brewpub that promoted “have dietary restrictions? let us know and we’ll happily accommodate them”.  And the other time was at Zoe’s Kitchen, which amazingly has menu items that they clearly mark as “Whole 30 compliant”.

We cooked.  A lot.  While we cooked plenty before, being Whole 30 compliant brought this to a whole new level.  With all the cooking, we learned to make larger batches to have leftovers for other meals to try and help reduce the sheer volume of cooking that would otherwise be necessary.

We prepared our own mayo and ketchup.  I like mayo – a lot – so we found and used a tasty recipe that is super simple: light olive oil, eggs, and lemon juice.  The only downside is the shorter shelf-life (which didn’t matter for us), and in my opinion, this tasted way better than the store-bought stuff.

For more “consequences” (which honestly are more like “benefits”), check out the article Going Whole 30 for 30 Days

Recommendation

If for no other reason than the amazing new food insights – even for people who are “food aware” – I strongly recommend trying the Whole 30 plan.  Do it for 30 days, take the reintroduction seriously, and find out your unique reactions to different foods, and become aware of the prevalence of soy and sugar.

For our parts, we have decided to integrate Whole 30 into our lifestyles.  While we aren’t committed to eating Whole 30 compliant for every meal every day, we are going to be intentional about eating Whole 30 compliant the majority of the time.  Life throws enough circumstances each week that we will likely eat 2-3 meals per week that are not compliant, but that leaves 18-19 meals per week that are, and we expect the results to be worthwhile.

If you’re considering trying it out, you may want to read our Top 10 Tips For Following Whole 30

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How is NutriVersity different than FormulaZone? https://nutriversity.com/blog/nutriversity-different-formulazone/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/nutriversity-different-formulazone/#comments Sun, 04 Jun 2017 16:47:41 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=443 Background: FormulaZone has been around for over 15 years (since 2001!). Around 6 years ago, when considering features we wanted to add to the site, we found ourselves “stuck” with many decisions that had been made during the construction of the site, and realized that the best course of action would be to create an […]

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Background:

FormulaZone has been around for over 15 years (since 2001!). Around 6 years ago, when considering features we wanted to add to the site, we found ourselves “stuck” with many decisions that had been made during the construction of the site, and realized that the best course of action would be to create an all-new version of the site, which is how NutriVersity was born.

NutriVersity is a newer, more modern system than FormulaZone.

Both sites offer a similar set of tools, but the NutriVersity version of the tools have been designed to be more powerful and easier to use.

For a good overview of what NutriVersity does, how it looks / feels, you should watch a few of our “how to” videos:
https://www.youtube.com/nutriversity

Differences:

Here are just a few of the comparison points between the two sites:

Things that are fairly similar:

FormulaZone provides a “Recipe Builder”, so you can build (and share) your own recipes.
NutriVersity provides a more powerful and flexible “Recipe Builder”, so you can build (and share) recipes.

FormulaZone provides Glycemic Index information (low, medium, high, etc), and automatically calculates the GI for recipes.
NutriVersity provides Glycemic Index information as the actual GI value (0-100), and automatically calculates the GI for recipes.

FormulaZone offers the ability to plan and save menus.
NutriVersity offers the ability to plan and save menus with a simpler, easier-to-use interface

FormulaZone offers “Family Style”, which allows you to plan menus for you, your partner, and your children (children are entered as a “group”, not individually).
NutriVersity offers “Family Plus”, which is greatly improved, allowing you much more control over planning menus for you, your partner, and children, and an interface that is simpler to use

FormulaZone allows you to enter your own custom ingredients if you can’t find one in the system
NutriVersity also allows you to enter your own custom ingredients

FormulaZone provides you a shopping list for your menu, and you can view the shopping list for a single day of the menu if you like
NutriVersity provides you with a shopping list for your menu (but you can only view it for the entire menu)

Things that are fairly different:

FormulaZone’s “food preferences” are somewhat limited. It allows you to “exclude” recipes with certain types of foods. It allows you to “exclude” recipes with specific ingredients.
NutriVersity’s “Allergens and Lifestyles” preferences are more practical and powerful. It allows you to choose from common “allergens” (Gluten, Tree Nuts, etc) you would like to avoid, and “lifestyles” (Kosher, Vegetarian, etc) you would like to follow. It allows you to “substitute” specific ingredients that you don’t want to eat.

FormulaZone’s recipes show you the Carbs, Protein, and Fat for each ingredient (and totals for the whole recipe)
NutriVersity allows you to choose which nutrients you care about. Carbs, protein, fat, as well as sodium, fiber, cholesterol, and many others – the list is long of which nutrients you can see when viewing / building recipes

Things that are very different:

FormulaZone is Zone Diet / 40-30-30 only.
NutriVersity supports Zone Diet / 40-30-30, as well as other diet plans (although currently, there aren’t any recipes for other plans)

FormulaZone has around 3,500 recipes in the system (all Zone / 40-30-30)
Currently, NutriVersity only has around 220 recipes in the system (most are Zone / 40-30-30)

FormulaZone offers an ingredient “Substitution Finder” (when looking at a recipe, if you see an ingredient you don’t want / like, you can find substitutes), but does NOT save the substitution, so you have to manually make note of any substitutions you want to make
NutriVersity offers a “Substitution Finder” which allows you to save the substitution for that single recipe, or for ALL recipes that contain that ingredient. (For example, you could substitute “Avocado” instead of “Mayo” in ALL recipes that contain Mayo).  That substitution shows up in the nutrition information, your shopping list, and all future views of the recipe

FormulaZone offers a list of “Packaged Meals” (like TV Dinners, etc) that are 40-30-30 balanced
NutriVersity does not have packaged meals

FormulaZone offers a Discussion Forum
NutriVersity does not offer a Discussion Forum

Lastly:

FormulaZone is receiving maintenance only, with no active / new development.
NutriVersity IS receiving active new development. We have a long list of features we are planning to add to make the site even more useful, powerful, and easy to use.

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Breast Cancer Prevention with Nutrition https://nutriversity.com/blog/breast-cancer-prevention-nutrition/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/breast-cancer-prevention-nutrition/#respond Tue, 03 Jan 2017 13:30:41 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=134 Cancer Prevention What do you think about meme’s that say “F*&% Cancer” or “Give cancer the middle finger”? Cancer is emotional, awful and universally and completely hated by ALL, including me. Everybody is affected by cancer. Yet…everybody seems to think that any cancer prevention advice is fake. When we see someone who has cancer we […]

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Cancer Prevention
Everybody hates cancer but nobody likes cancer prevention.

Everybody hates cancer…but nobody believes cancer prevention through nutrition is real.

What do you think about meme’s that say “F*&% Cancer” or “Give cancer the middle finger”? Cancer is emotional, awful and universally and completely hated by ALL, including me. Everybody is affected by cancer. Yet…everybody seems to think that any cancer prevention advice is fake. When we see someone who has cancer we would never dream in a million years that it could be a result of their food choices-or that some cancer cells could have been killed with certain foods. We understand that smoking causes cancer. Why is it so far out of our minds that our food choices can prevent, cause or fight cancer?

cancer prevention or 'war on delicious'?

Cancer prevention or ‘war on delicious’?

We all have this feeling of “everything causes cancer”. There are cancer warnings on everything; the warnings are on my kielbalsa and my nail polish. So we learn to tune it out! We get this feeling of “OH MY GOSH; you’re now saying (fill in the blank) causes cancer” and we stop listening. When the research shows that certain foods increase your risk of cancer-we label it as a ‘war on delicious’ instead of listening to the facts.

I was exactly the same way. Then I woke up and realized that there was truth to this.

Angiogenesis

This Ted talk by William Li is great. He asks ‘can we eat to starve cancer? I hope you pay attention! There are certain foods that are actually working in preventing and fighting cancer! They are called anti-angiogenesis foods. In my basic and layman’s understanding; angiogenesis is the process where your body grows more blood vessels. More blood vessels are needed in times of healing a wound or growing a placenta. More blood vessels are also grown when a cancerous tumor wants to live and get nice and fat and juicy inside your body. So we want to eat foods that promote healthy angiogenesis; where your body cuts off blood supply to bad things.

Angiogenesis Inhibitors or Anti-Angiogenesis

Dr. Fuhrman talks about them as ‘anti-cancer‘ foods. They are GBOMBS (Greens, beans, onions, mushrooms, berries, seeds) and should be eaten DAILY. That way when cancer cells start telling your body to provide blood vessels; the angiogenesis inhibitors will say “HECK NO!” and the cells will starve, die, and be excreted.

Cancer Prevention Strategies

Breast Cancer Prevention from Dr. Fuhrman

Breast Cancer Prevention from Dr. Fuhrman

Here are 10 Strategies for Breast Cancer Prevention from Dr. Joel Fuhrman. A lot of these are SIMPLE. Some are harder. I personally struggle with exercising three hours a week. And I can see how tip #10 may not apply to everybody-not everybody wants to have babies and a lot of women don’t want to or are unable to nurse. I know that some of these seem extreme and unnecessary; do you really need to give up fried foods, well done meats, and limit animal protein? Yes. If you want your best shot at breast cancer prevention then follow these guidelines. Don’t tune this out as “oh, everything causes cancer”. That is simply not true-vegetables, fruits, beans, and nuts do not cause cancer. They PREVENT and FIGHT cancer!

My story

In February of 2016 I finally had a shift in my thinking and switched to a Nutrittarian diet. As a Mom with three little kids; I was constantly getting colds and struggling with postpartum depression. Eating a nutrient dense saved me. I now try to eat foods that are high in nutrient density and I limit foods that are low in nutrient density and promote cancer and other diseases. I’m not perfect at it but my quality of life has dramatically improved and I am confident that my risk of cancer has decreased dramatically.

We all hate cancer; now let’s start eating to prevent it.

Whenever I heard advice like this I used to tune it out. I specifically remember being nervous about eating Kielbalsa during my first pregnancy. My loving husband said “no, don’t be silly, that doesn’t cause cancer”. That’s what I wanted to hear! I wanted to hear that it was some silly scientific study that didn’t apply to me. Now I know that it does, I have woken up and I am finally paying attention.

You have control

I hope you will not tune this out and that you will be encouraged that these small changes. They can dramatically improve your quality of life both now and in the future. Print these strategies from Dr. Fuhrman and place them on your fridge. Let this remind you daily that cancer is not only about your genes; but that YOU have control over how you eat and your overall cancer risk. We are not only victims; we have control. I hope you feel encouraged and empowered as you start your journey of cancer prevention!

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Beating Postpartum Depression with a Nutritarian lifestyle https://nutriversity.com/blog/beating-postpartum-depression-nutritarian-lifestyle/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/beating-postpartum-depression-nutritarian-lifestyle/#comments Tue, 27 Dec 2016 13:30:39 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=50 As a 28 year old Mom with three young kids; I was discouraged with life and constantly feeling tired and getting colds. I wanted my life to be better. I set out on a quest to figure out how to enjoy this season of life AS MUCH as I love my kids. My main discovery to enjoying this season of life is eating a Nutritarian diet! I, and my whole family, have improved health and are enjoying life! If you are a Mom and feeling tired and worn down; I encourage you to start eating vegetables and fruits immediately; then pick up a book by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. Reach out to us at Nutriversity if you need support and encouragement!

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September 30, 2015 Three weeks postpartum on my SAD (Standard American Diet)

September 30, 2015
Three weeks postpartum on my SAD (Standard American Diet)

Postpartum Depression

After my daughter was born in 2011 I can remember one word to describe how I felt her first year of life-EXHAUSTED. We were up with her several times every night; if she only woke up twice it was a GREAT night. We finally got started to get professional help when she was 10 months old. We started with a pediatric gastroenterologist (we thought she had stomach issues but she was completely fine). Then we saw a pediatric sleep psychologist and I started seeing a therapist who specialized in pregnancy, parenting and postpartum. The result from seeing the therapist was that I had postpartum depression; and that it was not the result of a chemical imbalance but from a lack of sleep. We started focusing on improving my sleep and within days I felt like myself again. I still saw this therapist regularly for the next year; and off and on for the next four years. My background is in Social Work and I have always seen the benefit of having a good therapist on your team. Even though I have a bachelor’s degree and even took a nutrition class in college; I did not have any sense to connect nutrition into healing my postpartum depression at this time-it was all about sleep.

Diet

During this time, I ate the Standard American Diet (SAD). My diet was heavy on meat, dairy, processed foods, white grains, sugar (CANDY!), oil and salt. I thought it was normal. As I got older something started to tickle my brain and I started to think that maybe I needed to ‘clean up’ my diet; but I was nowhere ready to admit it.

Grady’s birth

Fast forward to September 6th, 2011; the day we had our THIRD baby. To give you an idea of my diet; here’s what I ate during his birth.

  • Steak, mashed potatoes and bread from Texas Roadhouse (I was super disappointed that they forgot the gravy and butter)

    June 2016 4 months into my Nutritarian diet and feeling great!

    June 2016
    4 months into my Nutritarian diet and feeling great!

  • Breakfast casserole (eggs, cheese, sour cream, hash browns, ham)
  • Strawberry ice cream
  • An entire salted caramel chocolate bar
  • Twizzlers, crackers, apple juice

The word I would use to describe his first months of life is OVERWHELMED. I remember crying on the shower floor one day because I just didn’t know how I would get through the day. I would often beg my husband to come home early-which was very stressful for him. I was even asking him to take the entire month of December off of work (which would have been Leave Without Pay) because I just didn’t know how I was going to continue. We tried to focus on getting me more sleep; after all, that worked when we had our first baby and I felt depressed, and it didn’t work. I could not sleep well. Even when the baby slept, I had a hard time.  I had not been seeing my therapist for the last 2 years (everything was pretty smooth emotionally after we had our second) so I went back to her. After a few months we decided that it was time to try an anti-depressant.

Zoloft

I tried Zoloft; the only drug I was told I could take while nursing. Two weeks in I knew it was not going to be my answer. My sleep was getting worse; not better. I did not like the way it made me feel. I was not fired up towards life, excited or engaged the way I wanted to be. Then one weekend, at the end of February, it all came together. I talked to several friends who ate diets very heavy in vegetables. One friend cured an autoimmune disease with her diet; the other friend cured postpartum depression. On Friday I was eating SAD (standard American diet); by Monday I claimed I was eating “Whole food, plant based” (vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains, nuts and seeds)

A Nutritarian Lifestyle

“Nutritarian” is a term coined by Dr. Joel Fuhrman; it simply means eating foods that are nutrient dense. H=N/C (your health equals the amount of nutrients you consume divided by the amount of calories).

Eating a Nutritarian diet means you try to eat the MOST nutrients in the LEAST amount of calories. The chart he created is the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI). For example; kale, collard greens and mustard greens have a 1,000 rating (the highest you can get), peanut butter ranks at 51 and corn chips have a ranking of 7.

Dr. Fuhrman has written many amazing books, but the one I started with was How to Disease Proof Your Child. It changed my life. Because we followed his advice in that book our toddler no longer has a chronic cough or eczema. Our whole family is healthier and we are hardly ever sick. Before the diet change it seemed like we were getting colds constantly. And the biggest change is that my postpartum depression is gone. I stayed on the Zoloft for two more weeks, and then spent two weeks getting off of it. (I was on it for a total of 6 weeks). If I don’t eat to have a high ANDI score (like when I binge eat on dates, don’t eat leafy greens, or slip up and have straight up junk food) I feel tired and stressed again. That feeling is always fixed with getting back on track with eating, getting more sleep and reading an inspiring bookJ. The changes I’ve noticed since eating Nutritarian to cure postpartum depression

  • Great sleep
  • Positive mood
  • Clearer skin
  • 30 lb weight loss
  • Cholesterol is no longer high
  • HUGE increase in energy!
  • No more colds
Our Nutritarian Family

Our Nutritarian Family

A Nutritarian Lifestyle means

  • Eating mainly nutrient-dense foods: vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts and seeds.
  • Eating few, if any, animal products (one or two servings per week at most).
  • Eating no or almost no foods that are completely empty of nutrients or toxic to the body, such as sugar, sweeteners, white flour, processed foods, and fast foods.

Include in your daily diet

  • A large salad
  • At least one 1/2 cup serving of beans/legumes
  • At least three fresh (or frozen) fruits
  • At least one ounce of raw nuts and seeds
  • At least one large (double size) serving of cooked green vegetables

Avoid in your daily diet

  • Red meat and all barbecued, processed, and cured meats
  • Fried foods
  • Full fat dairy (cheese, ice cream, butter, whole milk, and 2% milk) and trans fats (margarine)
  • Soft drinks, sugar, and artificial sweeteners
  • White rice and white flour products

I know that may sound “Extreme” (at least that’s what people keep telling me); But the results are obvious in my life every day. Eating this way is doing more for me than the antidepressant could do. I’m not perfect, I still struggle sometimes and I have a lot to learn about this way of eating. But I am loving it; I feel great and my kids feel great. This is absolutely my cure for my postpartum depression.

Next Steps for you

I will forever be grateful to Dr. Fuhrman and all of his resources! So what do you do if you’re feeling how I was feeling? Are you tired, sick with colds and feeling discouraged? Start by adding vegetables and fruit to your diet immediately and get some sleep. Then pick up one Dr. Fuhrman’s books. Give it a try, and contact me at Nutriversity if you need some support.

My 29th Birthday in July; 5 months into eating Nutritarian.

My 29th Birthday in July; 5 months into eating Nutritarian.

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Cold and Flu Avoidance; and common remedies de-bunked! https://nutriversity.com/blog/cold-flu-avoidance-common-remedies-de-bunked/ https://nutriversity.com/blog/cold-flu-avoidance-common-remedies-de-bunked/#respond Wed, 02 Nov 2016 01:50:34 +0000 https://nutriversity.com/?p=168 Eating a Nutritarian diet will prevent getting sick during cold and flu season-and year round!

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We eat healthy to keep these three rugrats from getting the cold and flu!

No More Colds!

I originally wanted to write this post about how to stay healthy during cold and flu season…and when you have kids it seems like it is ALWAYS cold and flu season. At least, that’s how I felt last year. We have three kids; ages 5, 2, and 1. Last year it seemed like somebody in our family was always sick. It was never anything serious but it was enough to cancel play dates or to be feeling extra tired. Something as simple as a sore throat can interrupt sleep for the whole family. I was so discouraged because every time someone got a sniffle it felt like it just got passed to the whole family. Our quality of life was deteriorating because of the common cold and flu! My husband and I want to have more kids but I remember thinking “I can’t have more kids if somebody is always going to be sick!”.

Super Immunity

Super-Immunity by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. Check out chapter four "Colds and flu-what we need to know"

Super-Immunity by Dr. Joel Fuhrman

THEN I came across Dr. Joel Fuhrman. I love all of his books and Super Immunity is one of my favorites. We always hear “you are what you eat” but I never really believed it. I thought that my body would be pretty much the same; whether I ate a salad or a Wendy’s hamburger for lunch. I know that is not the case now! Did you know you can actually eat foods that will boost your immune system and therefor you will avoid colds and viruses? Isn’t that amazing?! So when somebody is always sick; and those illnesses are lasting a long time, it is due to their nutrition. In this post I will be giving you a few highlights of the chapter, Colds and Flu-What we need to know- in Dr. Fuhrman’s book, Super Immunity. (quick note: he has a whole section on antibiotics and viruses. Basically, antibiotics do not work for viral infections, have many negative side effects, and can make the virus last longer. Also check out his blog post about cold and flu season.

Cold and Flu for Kids

My favorite advice from Dr. Fuhrman about cold and flu is to “reduce food intake and consume primarily vegetable juice, vegetable soup, water and raw salad vegetables.” Now when my kids are sick we follow these guidelines. They don’t get sick often; and when they do it is gone very quickly. I used to give my kids fruit juice, popsicles, crackers and high sodium soups. After reading his chapter on cold and flu I feel armed with what to do to help my kids get over the cold quickly. I no longer live in fear of somebody in my house getting sick. And I don’t have to jump through hoops to get them well; like trying sinus rinses, baths, humidifiers and medicines.

Eat for Immunity

Follow Dr. Fuhrman’s principles of eating a nutrient dense diet every day! This will boost your immune system; not only for colds and the flu, but will protect you long term from strokes, heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Follow his nutritarian guidelines. Get lots of GBOMBS (Greens, Beans, Onions, Mushrooms, Berries, Seeds).

What you eat has more to do with whether or not you will get sick and how long it will last than cold remedies. But here is a simple break down of his chapter with what is helpful and what is a waste of time.

Remedies De-bunked

Cough medications: NAY! They do not work; and studies show that kids actually sleep worse and the illness is prolonged. Coughing is good when you’re sick; it’s your bodies way of getting the crud out!

Antihistamines: Middle ground.They don’t encourage a faster recovery but can make you sleepy. He recommends using them only if you are “uncomfortably awake at night and unable to sleep”.

Ibuprofen and Aspirin: NAY! They ‘may relieve a small amount of discomfort from fever but do not enhance recovery’. They can even make the illness last longer! Again, the fever is one of the ways your body is fighting the virus and/or infection. He says you can take it at night, sparingly, if the discomfort is limiting sleep. This one is close to my heart because I use to take Ibuprofen regularly just to help with basic every day aches and pains (that was back when I was not following a Nutritarian diet-now that I eat plenty of vegetables, fruits, beans and nuts; I have no need for pain medication).

Tylenol: NAY! He says to not even have it in your house; it can cause liver function abnormalities, liver damage and digestive tract problems.

Chicken Soup: NAY. When you are sick “eat lightly and avoid animal products that are more demanding to digest…make it vegetable soup over chicken soup.”

Humidifiers: NAY. This one is shocking, isn’t it? I always thought that having a humidifier was supposed to help. But “studies have shown that it has no effect on wheezing or coughing in croup, or on resolution of symptoms or accelerating recovery in the common cold.” I was shocked to read this one; but so relieved! I no longer have to deal with trying to clean a humidifier; they always get so gross that we end up throwing them away. No more!

Increased intake of fluids: NAY. “Excess fluids (beyond replacement of losses) have no favorable benefits…there is no scientific evidence for increasing fluids in acute respiratory infections over and above the demands of thirst.” Awesome.

Nasal Saline Irrigation: NAY. This might help with people who have chronic sinus infections; but not for the common cold. “That means subjecting your child to the discomfort of squirting water in his nose will not lessen complications or speed resolution of symptoms.” I have always been a fan of the sinus rinse; but now that I am eating for health-I never need one.

Vitamin C: Nay. Once you are already sick, Vitamin C supplementation does not help symptoms or recovery. Eat a diet full of vitamin C with raw fruits and vegetables and you won’t have to worry about a supplement.

Echinacea: Middle ground. It does not help once you are already sick. Don’t overuse this or any other herbal remedy.

Potentially helpful Remedies

Zinc, Vitamin D, Elderberry and berry flavanoids, and caloric restriction are likely helpful in recovering from the cold or flu. The most important is to eat a nutrient rich diet every day. Then you will not only avoid the cold and flu; but you will no longer live in fear of illness for you, your family, and your schedules.

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